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Exceptional Cases Justify Experimental Care

2nd September, 2016 By Arman Khosravi

In a unique decision, which will give hope to people who have family members being denied experimental treatments by the NHS on costs grounds, the NHS has been ordered to provide a pioneering new drug to a teenager whose bright future was threatened by a rare medical condition. Although the treatment would cost up to £13,000 a year, and had not yet been approved for prescription on the NHS, the High Court ruled that it was an exceptional case that deserved funding. The 17-year-old girl suffers from cataplexy, a condition...

Exceptional Cases Justify Experimental Care

2nd September, 2016 By Arman Khosravi

In a unique decision, which will give hope to people who have family members being denied experimental treatments by the NHS on costs grounds, the NHS has been ordered to provide a pioneering new drug to a teenager whose bright future was threatened by a rare medical condition. Although the treatment would cost up to £13,000 a year, and had not yet been approved for prescription on the NHS, the High Court ruled that it was an exceptional case that deserved funding. The 17-year-old girl suffers from cataplexy, a condition...

Non-Molestation Breach Conviction Quashed Due to Misdirection

30th August, 2016 By Arman Khosravi

Harassment is an unfortunate fact in some relationship breakdowns. In a bid to reduce the incidence of harassment and molestation following splits, the Family Law Act 1996 made it a criminal offence to breach a non-molestation order, rather than a contempt of court. The practical effect of this change was to make such a breach a matter for the police, not one which requires yet another round of court proceedings. The Act states that any such breach is a criminal offence. However, it dates from 'pre-Internet' days and was framed...

Non-Molestation Breach Conviction Quashed Due to Misdirection

30th August, 2016 By Arman Khosravi

Harassment is an unfortunate fact in some relationship breakdowns. In a bid to reduce the incidence of harassment and molestation following splits, the Family Law Act 1996 made it a criminal offence to breach a non-molestation order, rather than a contempt of court. The practical effect of this change was to make such a breach a matter for the police, not one which requires yet another round of court proceedings. The Act states that any such breach is a criminal offence. However, it dates from 'pre-Internet' days and was framed...